Types of 1950s Dress on Different Occasions

1950s Dress is not suitable for family wear

There were two classic styles of dress in the 1950s. Nowadays, the most popular style is the full-skirt tea-length dress, usually referred to as the 1950s swing dress. Another very elegant look is a fitted overcoat dress, which today is often referred to as a pencil or swing dress. Both styles come with moderate undershirts, narrow high waists, and light or brown skirts. Women of both styles wear the same, although the skirt-style dress is not suitable for family wear.

1950s house dress

1950s house dress

At home, women are cooking, cleaning and taking care of their children all day long. Her housewife dress is a full skirt swing dress with simple solid cotton, small prints, plaid, plaid and pinstripes. The shirt dress is the most popular design, which fastens the entire length of the front skirt or corset. They usually have sleeves as short as 3/4 length, large pockets, collars and thin matching fabric waistbands. Wear a light petticoat below to provide a sense of fullness, and an apron sits on the top to keep the clothes neat and tidy. Her shoes are usually flat shoes, but on TV, a housewife wears high heels.

1950s public outgoing dress

After leaving the house, women can continue to wear their own home clothes, plus some high-end accessories, such as pearl necklaces, earrings, gloves, hats, high heels and purses. This is acceptable for visiting friends or rash errands. In order to shop in the city, meet her husband, go on appointments or any other public occasions, her clothes must look good with coordinated accessories.

1950s summer dress

1950s summer dress

In the summer, the house dresses and the gowns that go out become more "interesting". Polka dots, border prints, sailor motifs, gingham, pastels and sleeveless dresses bring women back to the happy hours of childhood. Woman looks like little girl in big dress. Today, most of the 50s dresses that are copied and inspired use these younger, colorful designs.

 

1950s party dress

1950s party dress

Hosting a dinner or spending the night in the town, a woman once again changed her dress into a swing or a long skirt, made of richer materials such as silk, taffeta, lace, brocade and velvet. Black is the safest choice. Nine out of ten women attending the party wore black dresses. It is so chic, delicate, and easy to match with beautiful jewelry and the latest fluffy hairstyle.

 

Evening dresses are minimally trimmed. They usually don't have collars, buttons or belts. Some VA VA knitted collars have higher necklines and are round or V-shaped. Some have beads or sequins on the neckline of the neck, or embroideries on the corset, but other than that, the richness of the fabric and the clean lines make the cocktail dress good enough for most parties. Accessories include ordinary high heels, long or short gloves, matching envelope wallets, pearls or sparkling jewelry, and sometimes a coordinating little hat or short hair.

 

In order to hold a semi-formal party in your own house, there is an unusual dressing style called a hostess dress. Lucile Ball wore a black lace mistress gown in I Love Lucy, and every woman wanted one since then. The hostess's gown is a cross between the dress, skirt and capri pants. Capri pants are worn with a split skirt on the top, revealing the pants underneath. Skirts can be long or short, fancy or simple. Men don't like them ("Where are her legs?"), but women enjoy this casualness in a short time. They also wore jumpsuits without skirts!

1950s ball gown dress

1950s ball gown dress

On very special occasions, such as participating in a dance party or a theater performance, just wearing a short skirt is not enough. In these peculiar incidents, wear a long floor-to-ceiling dress or sexy long tube dress. The rich fabrics of silk, satin, taffeta, lace, organic yarn, netting, velvet, chiffon and netting can be gathered to create a dramatic volume, or can be draped to create the luxury of Hollywood star fashion.

 

For a complete evening dress, wear a multi-layer floor petticoat or hoop skirt underneath to form a wide A-shape or round teacup shape. Some mixed dresses are characterized by smooth draped front skirts and large back skirts or giant bows. Again, these are styles borrowed from the Victorian era. In the Victorian era, bigger is better, although newer fabrics make them lighter to wear.

 

Most party dresses have no sleeves, or may have thin spaghetti sleeves. To be modest, you can wear a matching shawl or blouse over the dress. Elbow-length gloves are necessary accessories, and personalized necklaces and earrings are also necessary.

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